sicktonary fFace Melter (Phace Melt-her) verb:  Point it! This G-force-bearing hill bomb leaves everyone else in the dust. Despite aerodynamics, the sheer winds encountered at this velocity can take their toll. When it comes to redlining it, a flat base leads to a melted face!

 

Fall Line [fawl lahyn] noun The hypothetical path an object would take from the top to the bottom of a slope as dictated by terrain and gravity.

 

Fakie [fay-kee]verb Riding tail-first, or backwards.

 

Farm [Fahrm] noun: To use snow-grooming equipment to gather snow and move it to a specific area to provide added coverage or accumulate mass piles of snow for special features.

 

Fassy [Fah-seeeee] noun: Derived from the Latin root ‘Fassyhole” and used when someone is being a massive fangita and is not doing the trick or maneuver that they wish to do because of fear.

 

Fillers [Fihl-luhrs] adj: Stock footage in a rider’s video part, “filler” shots are the direct opposite of “hammers.” Fillers are mostly comprised of sized-down bangers and stock tricks. “He had some hammers, for sure, but mainly it was just filler shit like that jenkem-sounding track ‘Oceans’ from Pearl Jam’s debut album, Ten.”

 

Film Crew (Philm Cru) nounThe group of snowboarders that one films with. The average film crew consists of one filmer, a photographer, lights, sounds, shovels,  generators, drop-in ramps, and drop-out kids.

 

Firecracker [fi-urr-crahk-urr] verb: Tailpressing down a flight of stairs so your tail slaps each and every step on the way down, making it sound very similar to firecrackers exploding.

 

Fish [fish] noun A snowboard with a wide nose and narrow tail. Designed to enhance a board’s floatation in deep snow.

 

Fisheye (Phish-i), noun:  Video or photo lens that provides the widest perspective of any given angle.

 

Fixed-grip [Fixxd Grihp] noun: Older lifts that feature chairs, which are permanently affixed to the cable.

 

Flat Base (Flat Base) noun When one’s snowboard is completely flush with the desired surface of the obstacle one is riding, whether it be a wallride, rail, ledge, Giant Slalom course, or jump. The most solid wallrides are ridden flat-based. Not to be confused with “freebase”… Some tricks are only dope when done flat-based.

 

Flatbottom [flaht bot-uhm] noun The part of a halfpipe that goes across the fall line between the transitions of the left and right walls.

 

Flatground [flaht grow-nd] noun Tricks performed on a featureless part of a slope.

 

To Flat (Tuh-Flat) noun Any feature that offers zero transition in the landing area. Commonly found in stair-set ollies, drop-offs after rails or ledges, or parking lot transfers. Properly executed by Mr. Mikey LeBlanc on a regular basis.

 

Flow (Ph-loh) noun:  Being on “flow” means hooking riders up with gear via warehouse overstock. It places a potential career within their mitts, minus the money. In this case, a “heavy-flow month” is a very good thing.

 

Flute [Flooht] noun: A column of snow loaded up on a terrain feature (like a pile of rocks) giving the protrusion the look of a stack of scooped ice cream. Despite the precarious appearance of these phenomena, while they are dangerous, they’re surprisingly resilient.

 

Follow-Cam [Fah-loh Kam] verb: When a friend/filmer trails a rider while recording their every maneuver. Wide-angle lenses are optimal for this type of filming.

 

Foreplay (For-play), noun: When a person plants their hand below the coping of a feature.

 

Forward Lean [fawr-werd leen] noun The degree to which a highback is angled.

 

Fracture[frak-cher] noun Area on a slope where a layer of snow breaks to create an avalanche or slide.

 

Fresh[fur-resh] adjective Natural, untouched powder snow.

 

Frontside Boardslide [fruhnt-sid bord-slid] noun: When the feature is approached pre-jib from the rider’s toeside edge and then slid in a manner that has one’s back facing squarely downhill perpendicular to the obstacle.

 

Frontside Lipslide [fruhnt-sid lihp-slid] noun: Approaching the rail with it on your toe edge. Ollie and get your tail over the rail, locking in to a boardslide. High risk and severe consequences await if you catch your tail on the rail while ollieing over it.

 

Frontside Rodeo [fruhnt-sahyd roh-dio]

Noun A frontside flipping spin off the toe edge, where your trailing knee is thrust over your leading shoulder. See that leopard-clad Munchkin Daniel Franck, circa 1995.

 

Foam Core [Fohm Kohr] noun: A cheap and fireproof alternative to wood as a core material, foam was significantly heavier than other alternatives. Foam also lacked the inherent memory required to maintain ideal flex characteristics. Twenty years ago, all entry-level boards were made with foam cores. Today, they are made with Chinese labor.

 

Frontside Spin [fruhnt-sahyd spin] verb From takeoff, the subject spins heelward, with the ability to see the landing for the first 180 degrees of rotation.

 

Frontside Wall [fruhnt-sahyd wawl] noun The wall of a halfpipe that the front of your body is facing. Also known as the toeside wall. If you’re regular, it’s rider’s right. Goofy, it’s rider’s left.

 

FS: An acronym for the word “Frontside,” referring to the direction that one is spinning.

 

FT: Means “First Try,” in reference to one landing a trick upon their initial attempt. In non-snowboard related terms, “FT” is a short form attached to a number to denote the measurement “feet” in relation to the distance from one point to another. “That jump was around 60 ft, and I got my trick FT.” The current usage has caused many of today’s biggest pros to develop a full-blown FT fetish.

 

Funicular [Fuhn-ik-u-lerr] noun: An alpine train which travels uphill on steel rails.